brand for good

a blog by McGill Buckley

Brands of Confusion

Brands of Confusion

 

With apologies to those Motown hit makers The Temptations for openly (but lovingly) ripping off the title of their classic song from the early 1970’s for the title of this post, we feel the need to talk about confusion in the world of branding.

To put it simply, brand confusion is running wild these days with almost as many definitions of what branding is as there are brands. We witness brand uncertainty almost daily when speaking with clients, prospective clients, co-workers, business partners and colleagues.

To be fair to almost all involved, it is entirely understandable why so many people seem to be confused about branding because – branding is something with multiple layers and nuances. It can be difficult for many to wrap their head around the subject of branding.

Where we see people getting themselves into a pickle over branding is when they come at it from perilous perspectives. Here are a couple of the perilous perspectives we hear frequently:

Perilous Brand Perspective 1: We can redefine our brand with a new logo.

While of course your brand logo is important, in and of itself it will not define your brand. A brand logo is but a single element of what a brand represents. There are lots of great brands with mediocre logos and conversely there are scores of beautifully crafted, award-winning logos that are attached to mediocre brands.

 Perilous Brand Perspective 2: We get to determine what our brand means.

Unfortunately not quite true. While what a brand does, says, acts like and delivers in the way of products, services and benefits is critically important, it only influences what a brand is. Ultimately what other people outside the brand think about the brand is what truly determines the meaning and value of a brand. Scary stuff but that is the one of the stark realities of branding.

Have we managed to confuse you even more?

 


About the Author

Stephen McGill

Unabashed words guy, branding evangelist and voracious reader of anything to do with marketing, branding, creativity and design, Stephen McGill has worked in the agency business for over three decades.

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